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50Plus

May 21, 2015

6300 UCClermont 50plus pcard

American artist Will Barnet (1911-2012) said:

“Painting is almost like a religious experience, which should go on and on.Age just gives you the freedom to do some things you’ve never done before. Great work can come at any stage of your life.”

The exhibition by ten local artists over fifty-years of age includes 2D works (oil, acrylic, mixed media, photography), bronze sculptures, and found object installations. The works feature subjects such as nature, global culture, social and personal topics through traditional and non-traditional creative processes.

 

 

 

Participating artists:

Merlene Schain is a painter and mixed media artist. She graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Cincinnati, and has been exhibiting internationally since 1972. Cincinnati born, in the family lineage of Rookwood Pottery, and a direct decedent of German master painter Adolph von Menzel, Merlene Schain is an acclaimed art educator in the Midwest. She has also been a Visiting Professor at the University of Cincinnati and Art Academy of Cincinnati. Her own artwork is in several prestigious private and public collections including Fidelity Investments, Merrill Dow, and Lifesphere, among others. 

NewGuineaandOceanic

New Guinea and Oceanic by Merlene Schain

Greg Loring is Cincinnati area native, and currently residing downtown.
His artistic endeavors began as a freelance photographer and photojournalist focused on capturing the expressions, emotion, and everyday moments of life.
Explorations into new mediums and art processes brought growth and unexpected discoveries as an artist that was evolving through full-time studies and studio work while enrolled in the BFA program at the University of Cincinnati, DAAP, School of Art.
Greg is currently in his second year MFA in sculpture at Miami University. He continues to enjoy creating large-scale sculpture and the casting of works in metal, as well as creating and composing art installations utilizing found objects and videos.
His works are often inspired or driven the work from the phenomenal world in which we live.

Existential Moment

Existential Moment by Greg Loring

Farron Allen grew up in the mountains of Southern West Virginia, the product of three generations of coal miners. Allen is a sculptor who uses fabricated and found metal objects, cast and welded together. He currently teaches Sculpture Foundry at the University of Cincinnati.

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Sculpture by Farron Allen

Cindy Hamann is a local artist and her studio is located at Essex Studios in Walnut Hills.
She states: “I love art … in all its myriad expressions … but my passion is pastels.  For me, no other artistic medium is so immediate, gritty, and real.  Working with my pastels is like working with nature.  I never quite know what the result will be until I “plant” some color on my paper and watch it take on a form of its own.” 

Lady In Waiting by Cindy Hamann

Lady In Waiting by Cindy Hamann

Lisa Molyneux is an artist based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Lisa worked as a Scenic Artist for the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park for 20 years. Her studio, located at Essex Studios in Walnut Hills, is where she produces fine art oil paintings. Her studio is open for the four Art Walk events at Essex Studios, and she also exhibits work in galleries. 
Current works by Lisa Molyneux focus on landscapes. Her subject matter is swamps, bogs, moors and all marshy areas not inhabited by man. She relies on heavy textures and an intense use of light to create drama in her paintings.

Landscape by Lisa Molyneux

Landscape by Lisa Molyneux

Mark Patsfall is an artist, printmaker and publisher. In 1979 he received his MFA from the University of Cincinnati. In 1979 he designed and assisted in the construction of Prasada Press, a fine art lithography press in Northside run by Janice Forberg, and printed there till 1981. He founded Clay Street Press, Inc. in 1981, and since has worked with many local, national and international artists in the creation of original prints and multiples. Working with Carl Solway Gallery (1984 – 2000) he was chief designer and technician for video artist Nam June Paik. Also working with Carl Solway Gallery and Volatile (as co-publisher) he printed or oversaw the fabrication of works by many artists of national or international reputation.

Consumer by Mark Patsfall

Consumer by Mark Patsfall

Frank Satogata was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, and now lives in Cincinnati, Ohio where he has worked as a graphic designer for more than 30 years. He studied at the University of Minnesota, the Heatherly School of Fine Art in London, England, the Columbus College of Art and Design and Syracuse University.  He has been an adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati and the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Frank is now combining design with art and works in his studio and design office at the Brazee Street Studios in Oakley.

Garden of Delights  by Frank Satogata

Garden of Delights by Frank Satogata

Tad Barney grew up in Waynesville, Ohio, studied photography at Wright State University as undergraduate, and as graduate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Ohio University.
He has worked as a freelance illustrator, graphic designer and caricature artist until the fall of 2008, when advances in digital processes and the ability to share images through social-networking sites reignited his passion for photography.
Tad’s work has been displayed in several national and international group and solo art exhibitions, and published in newspapers and magazines such as the Cincinnati Enquirer and Edible Ohio Valley magazine.
Barney currently lives in Milford Ohio with his wife Cathy and two daughters, Autumn and Lily.

Scenes of Italy by Tad Barney

Scenes of Italy by Tad Barney

Dan Vance is a painter and 2-D artist. Born in a small town in the hills of Virginia, his family came to Cincinnati in the 1950’s to escape the violence of the miners’ strikes.  His curiosity led to a B.S. Secondary Education, M.S. Mathematics, M.S., Mechanical Engineering, and a Ph.D. Computer Science & Engineering.  When on trips to present papers at conferences in the U.S. and Europe, he would visit art museums in his free time.  His interest in art eventually led to a B.F.A. Fine Arts in 2014.

Untitled by Dan VAnce

Bruno Zabaglio was born in Naples, Italy, arriving in the U.S. at the age of twenty-four, where he spent nearly twenty years living in Seattle, WA. In 1991 he relocated with his wife and two children to Cincinnati, where he currently lives. Bruno has been drawing and painting since his early teen-years, studying with two artist uncles, Gennaro and Armando Olivieri. Bruno received a BFA and a Curatorial Practice Graduate Certificate from the University of Cincinnati’s College of DAAP. He maintains a professional studio at the Essex Studios where he creates his own work and participates in the Essex Studios Art Walks throughout the year in addition to organizing area art exhibitions.

thewriter

The Old Writer by Bruno Zabaglio

 

 

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University Of Cincinnati ALUMNI ART SHOW

September 26, 2014

AlumniArtShow email invitationThe UC ALUMNI ART SHOW exhibition at the UC Blue Ash Art Gallery was a tribute to some of the many artists that graduated from the University of Cincinnati through the years. The works on display, which include a variety of styles, techniques, and media, emphasize these artists’ outstanding artistic level and the undisputed importance that the University of Cincinnati had in their artistic life.

Congratulations and thanks to the following Alumni:

Anjali Alm-Basu (2012 Alumna)
Angelina Kelly (2006 Alumna)

Eunshin Khang (1986 Alumna)
Paul Loehle (2009 Alumnus)

Barbara A. Reif (1958 Alumna)
Jamie Schorsch (2004 Alumna)

Kim Taylor (2006 Alumna)
Trish Weeks (1978 Alumna)

Paige Williams (1990 Alumna)
Amy Bogard (2005 Alumna)

Joan Effertz (1977 Alumna)                                                                
Beverly Erschell (1971 Alumna)

Richard Fruth (2001 Alumnus)
Gina Gorsek (2009 Alumna)

Mark Hanavan (2003 Alumnus)
Jeffrey Jones (2000 Alumnus)

Alex Kaplan (2013 Alumna)
Becky Lipps (1988 Alumna)


Anjali Almbasu

Anjali Almbasu

Mark Hannavan

Mark Hannavan

Kim Taylor

Kim Taylor

Jamie Schorsch

Jamie Schorsch

Barbara A. Reif

Barbara A. Reif

Angelina Kelly

Angelina Kelly

Amy Bogard

Amy Bogard

Eunshin Khang

Eunshin Khang

Becky Lipps

Becky Lipps

Alex Kaplan

Alex Kaplan

Fruth_Richard_

Richard Fruth

Paul Loehle

Paul Loehle

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NATURE-ALLEY

September 28, 2013

Nature-alley
Observation, Representation, and Interpretation of Nature in Art
Curated by Bruno Zabaglio

cardsample

Nature, defined in Webster’s dictionary as “The external world in its entirety” or, more specifically, as “The physical world including all living things as well as the land and the sea’”, is the theme of this exhibition. Ten local artists share some of their nature-inspired work with the students and staff of UC Clermont College and with other visitors to the Park National Bank Art Gallery.
Appreciation for the arts in Greater Cincinnati has risen year after year and, thanks to venues such as this art gallery, many local artists have the opportunity to show their works. The artworks on display are just a small example of the artistic capital existing in our area. I believe they are an excellent illustration of what the English poet, painter, and print maker William Blake meant when he stated: “Some see nature all ridicule and deformity . . . and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
The media and techniques present in the exhibit emphasize the diversity of artistic expression in our community and the uniqueness with which each artist approaches his or her observation, representation, and interpretation of Nature.
The ten artists cover a wide range of subjects, and their distinctive techniques, such as mixed media, bronze, natural wood, found objects, and their distinct styles, create an impressive and unique array of works associated with Nature.

Group photo

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Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2

March 22, 2010

by Bruno Zabaglio

Federico Fellini

Federico Fellini

In 1963, Italian film director Federico Fellini made a movie titled Otto e Mezzo (Eight and a Half). The unusual title corresponded to the number of movie that he had directed up to that point: seven feature films and two collaborative segments that he considered half a movie.
Most feature films can be discussed and analyzed without knowing much about its director. This is not the case for Fellini’s 8 1/2. Federico Fellini is not just the director of the film; he is Guido Anselmi. I agree with Fabrizio Borin, Professor of History of the Cinema at the Ca’ Foscari’ University of Venice, in his book titled “Federico Fellini-A Sentimental Journey into the Illusion and Reality of a Genius”, when he says: “If one called La Dolce Vita an epic, one can say that Eight and Half is an extraordinary vision of memory turned into fable, the autobiography of a crisis overcome through the power of imagination and a freedom of expression never before seen on screen.”
Federico Fellini was born in Rimini, Italy, a small town on the Adriatic Sea, on January 20, 1920. He left his hometown in 1938 and after a brief stay in Florence, he moved to Roma in 1939, where he lived until his death on October 31, 1993. Fabrizio Borin, writing about Fellini’s move to Rome, quotes the director himself on the trip from Rimini to Florence and then Rome, and his feeling toward his final destination: Rome. Fellini says: “I stayed there [Florence] for about four months. Rome is where I really wanted to go … No sooner had I arrived than I felt at home. This is the secret of Rome’s seductiveness. It is not like being in a city, but rather like being in one’s own apartment … Rome became my home at first sight. That was the moment of my birth. It is my real birthday. If I could remember the date, I would celebrate it.”
Rome was where Fellini’s career in the film industry began. He started co-writing screenplays for Italian Neorealism filmmakers such as Roberto Rossellini, for the film Roma, Città Aperta (Rome, Open City) in 1945 and Paisà in 1946), and Alberto Lattuada, for the film Senza Pietà (Without Pity) in 1948 and Il Mulino Del Pò (The Mill On The River Pò) in 1949. In 1950 he started his directorial career by co-directing the film Variety Lights with Alberto Lattuada. In the span of forty years, from 1950 to 1990, Fellini wrote and directed twenty-four feature films and received numerous awards and nominations, among which are four Oscars for Best Foreign Movie: “La Strada” (1954), “Nights Of Cabiria” (1957), “8 1/2” (1963), and “Amarcord” (1974).
According to Peter Bondanella, retired Professor of French and Italian and Comparative Literature at Indiana University, and author of the book The Films of Federico Fellini (2002), Fellini’s movies have influenced and inspired through the years Broadway shows, television commercials, and other filmmakers, including Lina Wertmüller, Woody Allen, Giuseppe Tornatore, and Martin Scorsese. The latter, in a brief introduction to the 1995 book titled Federico Fellini, edited by Italian movie critic Lietta Tornabuoni, reflected on the nature of Fellini’s movies and how they relate to the Neorealism. On the topic of the Neorealism he says: “Neorealism was a moment in the world of cinema born of historical circumstance … characterized by the use of real locations, nonprofessional actors, an almost documentary approach to contemporary stories, and much technical ingenuity”, and when relating Fellini’s films to an artistic period he adds: “By contrast, Fellini’s autobiographical, spiritual, and magical world did not fit easily into an ideology or code … What Fellini carried over from Neorealism into his films was what one might call an overwhelming sense of the physical world.”
According to Peter Bondanella, Fellini’s early films had a closer “dialectic” connection with neorealist cinema. From La Dolce Vita on, and especially 8 1/2 and Giulietta degli Spiriti (Juliet of the Spirits, 1965), Fellini’s movies “… would move beyond any overriding concern with the representation of social reality and concentrate upon the subjective, often irrational areas of human behavior connected with the psyche or the unconscious.” I agree with Bondanella’s analysis, and I would add that 8 1/2, with its dreams and the visions scenes, which represent the main character Guido Anselmi’s reconnection with his memories or dealing with his personal, social, and professional problems, blended and gently contrasted with the reality sequences (populated by quasi-caricatural characters), creates the perfect example of a Fellini film where, as a conceptual director, he is able to stray away from sequential narrative.
The extravagant and surreal cocktail of reality and imagination that compose 8 1/2 are, according to Peter Wuss, a German Professor of Film at the College for Film in Postdam-Babelsberg (Germany), also the product of the influence on Fellini of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung’s theory on dreams. According to Wuss, Jung considered “dreams as involuntary psychic activity that is just conscious enough to be reproducible in the waken state.” Wuss’s analysis of the film, in the essay titled: Dreamlike images in Fellini’s 8 1/2 and Tarkovsky’s The Mirror: A Cognitive Approach, and published in The Journal of moving Image Studies, (volume 4, 2005), also takes under consideration the impact that such cinematographic structure has on the viewer. He points out that in 8 1/2 “the traditional fabula of narrative cinema, a cognitive structure”, which helps the spectator be aware of what happens in a story, has been completely dissembled. He supports this theory with a quote of Fellini himself explaining that the theme of the film was: “The story of a director that is supposed to make a film, which he then forgets, and which he then takes … in two directions, that of fantasy and that of reality.”
Although every sequence in the film is very important and is filled with symbolisms related in one way or another to Guido and Fellini’s present and past, I see some as more determinant in the understanding of the film and its the main points, and I will focus on these in this discussion.

Opening scene

Opening scene of "8 1/2"

The opening dream scene shows Guido, played by Italian actor Marcello Mastroianni, stuck in a traffic jam, being asphyxiated by the smoke that suddenly appears inside the car as he struggles to escape from the enclosure; all this happens while the passengers of the adjacent cars watch him. Finally he crawls out and floats away from the traffic with the help of a liberating wind. Being able to fly is a common dream event and usually symbolizes a pleasant escape from reality. Unfortunately, Guido’s dream is interrupted by someone pulling him down by a rope attached to his leg that makes him fall toward the sea and back into reality. When he wakes up, he is at the Terme (Spa), and doctors and nurses are discussing and recommending absurd dietary prescriptions surround him.
This scene, like almost all the scenes unrelated to dreams or visions, has a semi-surreal feeling; it is like living in a constant state of daydreaming, where the people who are around, and with whom we interact are oppressive and demanding. Fabrizio Borin describes Guido’s passive interaction with most of the other characters as an “experience … almost exclusively passive” of the oppressive attention of others makes him feel “caught in a spider-web from which he does not know how to free himself.” Whenever he tries to escape, people go after him and call his name (Guido, or Guidino, or Guidone). Borin is of the opinion that 8 1/2 is also the acclamation of the name Guido “ whose echoes makes us think of ‘Viaggio con Anita‘…and its hero Guido, a project originating in the memory of his father’s death.” Viaggio con Anita (A journey for Love), was a film based on the account of his trip to Rimini in 1956 on the occasion of his father death. This was a project that Fellini always wanted to make into a movie, but that was ultimately made by Italian film director Mario Monticelli in 1979.
The next significant scene is at the spa grounds, when a girl dressed in white (Claudia), played by Italian actress Claudia Cardinale, appears to Guido in a dreamlike fashion and offers him a cup of healing mineral water. The purposely-overexposed sequence of this beautiful woman symbolizes Guido’s search for clarity in his life, with the water as a source of purification. Claudia reappears in the Harem daydream scene and also at the end of the movie, when she drives off with Guido to an old piazza to discuss the film and a part for her. Here Guido finally admits that there is not a part for her. It seems that he is finally finding the courage to confess his lies and confusion. Fabrizio Borin sees the character of Claudia as a solution to Guido’s fears, and states that the choice of “the young Claudia Cardinale, with her deep, hoarse voice, triggers the stream-of-consciousness, the flow of a man’s consciousness, in teetering balance between the possible and the illusory.”
Guido Anselmi is not only searching for answers to the crises in his professional life as a film director, but because of his Catholic upbringing, which reflects Fellini’s own religious background, he is also seeking a solution to his struggle between sacred and profane love. The lustful love with his mistress Carla, played by Italian actress Sandra Milo, and the conjugal love for his wife Luisa, played by French actress Anouk Aimée, are confusing him to the point that he imagines all of them living happily together. The harem dream sequence starts as part of the episode in which Guido is sitting at an outdoor cafe with his wife and her best friend, and his lover Carla arrives. In order to avoid confrontation with Luisa, he slips into a daydream and fantasizes of a place where all his women, including the oversized prostitute Saraghina from his youthful memories, would live together and adore him. Fellini transforms the farmhouse, where Guido as a boy visited his grandmother, into a harem. The scene, which begins with Guido bringing the women presents, is the representation of a man’s inner wish to possess all the women that he desires, that all would pamper him and adore him until, once they get too old, they would be retired to the upstairs of the house and no longer service him. To further emphasize Guido’s need for empowerment, Fellini introduces at the end of the sequence an uprising of the women forced to go upstairs. Guido faces the challenge like a circus animal trainer, using a whip to tame the women and reestablish the harmony in his life.

The harem dream sequence

The harem dream sequence

According to Fabrizio Borin, the exotic and exaggerated appearance of most women in Fellini’s movie and in Guido’s life are presented in a “cinematic image” and therefore he sees “no continuity” between the “women of the world and those of Guido’s movie.” These women are “gigantically enlarged” in order to “connect to the symbolism of the protagonist, who sees himself and his childish world in macroscopic dimensions.” Borin also sustains that these representations connect with Fellini’s esthetics of memory, an artistic language enables him to mix his reality and the memories from his personal life with those of the movie, without any special effects.
Toward the end of the film, Fellini introduces the press conference sequence in which the producer wants to divulge the news that the filming of the movie is going to begin. At the conference, his producer, tired of paying for his confusion and his crises, informs Guido that he has to say something about the new film. Guido is overwhelmed by the aggressive and hostile questions, and by his own mental confusion. He feels trapped with no way out; he wants everything to end. But he realizes that the only way to make all this vanish is for him to disappear. He crawls under the table and takes a gun out of his pocket. The sequence ends with the sound of a gunshot and the close-up of Guido’s head resting on the ground.
Alan A. Stone, Professor of Law and Psychiatry at Harvard University, wrote in his essay titled 8 1/2: Fellini’s Moment of Truth (1995) that this sequence is like a “frenzied cocktail party for the press” and is also where “Guido’s worst dream seems to have come true. Fellini here appears to be portraying his creative implosion and perhaps recognizing the awful truth.” He argues that the suicide is a symbolism for Guido to end the project and realize his failure; in fact,
in the next scene we find out that he has not committed suicide. Guido is walking away from the spaceship set, and he is saying good-bye to the crew until the next project. The voice of someone ordering the dismantlement of the big platform makes final the termination of the project.
Fellini has one more surprise for the viewer. The last scene is, according to Alan Stone, “…a kind of redemption.” A procession of all the characters in Guido’s life, all dressed in white, make their appearance. Everybody is there: Claudia, the women of his imaginary harem, and even his mother and father. Four clowns followed, by the child Guido, enter the scene playing a joyful circus like music to lead the procession that will take everyone around in a circle. Guido takes his wife’s hand and joins the happy circle dance. The set changes in the last sequence into a circus ring where, illuminated by a fading spotlight, there is only the young Guido playing the flute. Among the several psychological hypotheses that interpret the film and its finale, Stone’s is that “Fellini went through a Jungian analysis during a mid-life crisis, and (that) 8 1/2 is his cinematic transcription of what he worked out on the couch.” He adds that the theory of 8 1/2 being a healing expedition explains the final reconciliation of Guido with his wife; and that when he says to her: “accept me the way I am”, he has also come to terms with who he is. The final scene, the young Guido playing in the fading spotlight, emphasizes the recognition by Guido/Fellini of the “child in himself.” Fabrizio Borin, when describing 8 ½, states: “Eight and Half remains an inimitable recherché, a psychoanalytic journey in which the couch is replaced by the trolley, and mounted on it a movie camera that speaks’ sotto voce, fluttering in the entrancing wind.”
In conclusion, I believe that is accurate to refer to Federico Fellini as an auteur because his films are an exceptional example of artistic vision and creativity, and innovating directorial ability.

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Art, absinthe and aerial acrobatics. Reflections of a great night at the Essex Open House.

October 3, 2009

It was another great night at The Essex Studio’s fall open house. With over 100 artists calling The Essex ‘home’, it is nearly impossible to take in the entirety of the event in one evening, and thus they have two nights (Friday, October 2 & Saturday, October 3, 6pm – 11pm). Even on a slow night, an Essex open house can be a bit overwhelming. This time however, there was a different kind of energy coursing through the event.

Upon approaching the entrance, one is greeted by a bevy of beauties, all bathed in the light of a million watt bulb while dangling from the ropes, circus rings and strips of cloth that hang from the entryway awning. Known collectively as “The Amazing Portable Circus”, these women displayed their pseudo death-defying feats of acrobatics perilously over the concrete that leads to the mammoth doorway.

I watched as one girl climbed to the very top, with nothing more than two strips of cloth wrapped around her legs for support. At the summit of her climb, she inverted herself, and then suddenly slipped, nearly plunging head first to the ground. Of course, I was completely fooled. She had it under control the whole time. This apparently is the sort of thing that goes along with the choreography of what The Amazing Portable Circus does. A little thrill to go along with the grace of their art.

Heart beat returning to normal, I moved past the mini-Vegas that is the American Sign Museum and into the throngs of people looking at, talking about, bargaining for and making art. Its an easy thing to get lost in the cacophony and shear magnitude of the place, as it becomes a glorious assault on all five senses. A sort of old world bazaar of the bizarre and the wonderful.

Pushing my way past a million sights and sounds, and having made it up one of the several secret flights of stairs, I arrive at my destination; studio number 260, better known as the studio of my good friend, Bruno Zabaglio. As if by psychic powers, Bruno is standing in the doorway, waiting to greet me. He points to the wall behind me and says, “Wish him a happy birthday”. I turn to see Bruno’s incredible portrait of Mohandas Ghandi. I bid the great man a happy birthday and then enter the studio to see what Bruno had on display.

Bruno’s studio at The Essex is half art gallery and half workspace. Up front is the gallery area, ever-changing and yet carefully themed with Bruno’s work on three walls. In the back, you’re able to peer into his work area (or as I refer to it, ‘the engine room’), where Bruno paints, using the natural light afforded by the bank of windows that line the back wall. None of this however, would have caught the visitor’s gaze this evening. What first grabbed the attention of each and every newcomer to Bruno’s studio, was his magnificent new piece, ‘Reflections’.

Commissioned by the local group ‘Branch’ for the cover of their latest CD, ‘Reflections’ is a stunning painting of color and gesso. At once, it is an explosion of color and texture that pulls you in. An organic Rorschach that makes you want to both define it’s patterns and yet not dare to do so. As with any great painting, photographs are pale representations of the original. You must be in it’s presence, up close and personal, to fully appreciate it’s impact.

Throughout the night, visitors entered Bruno’s studio and inevitably were drawn like moths to a flame to this beautiful new work. Everyone tried to place either a meaning or a price on this brave new work. While delighted with the interpretations, Bruno avoided all attempts at affixing a price to ‘Reflections’, stating only that the right of first refusal went to ‘Branch’. My suspicions are that Bruno is reluctant to place a dollar value on anything he creates. To him, the world of commerce and the world of his art spin on entirely different planets and have nothing to do with each other.

Here was the energy. People felt compelled to linger inside the four walls of Bruno’s studio. After being dazzled by ‘Reflections’, they would inevitably wander over to his other works and inquire about their meaning or his process. Bruno would point out and say, ‘That’s my grandmother’ or ‘That’s my daughter’, and then begin educating his small audience, not only about his technique, but his motivations.

One man arrived and saw his own daughter in a painting of Bruno’s. It wasn’t that she was really in the painting, but something about the tone and imagery struck the chord of memory in him about his daughter. Like all men his age, he was proud of, and at the same time, missed his daughter, who he said worked in the theater in L.A. He was clearly affected by this painting and it was another wonderful example of the kind of energy blowing through The Essex.

I left Bruno with his would-be patrons and headed outside for a cigarette. On my return, I found that Bruno had wandered down to the studio of Lisa Molyneux another accomplished artist with a cozy studio. I found Bruno in the back work area with Lisa and her friend Ingrid.

“Do you want an absinthe, my friend?”, asked Bruno as he was mixing up the green stuff in two plastic cups. I declined, having earlier had my limit of wine in Bruno’s studio. Instead, I sat with Ingrid and we compared her relatively exciting college years in Manchester with my rather uneventful and pedestrian stint in college. I want a ‘redo’.

Three hours had blown by in the blink of an eye and it was time to leave. I had to return to the world outside of The Essex. A world that seemed to have far less energy and delight in it. But alas, there was editing to be done, alone and in silence. Its how I do my best work.

As I sped home, I realized that I hadn’t scratched the surface of all that was available to me at The Essex. That may both be the curse and the blessing. Like any good entertainment, you’re left wanting more when it is over. In this case, you know there is more and you are compelled to see it. Thank God there are two nights, though upon reflection, that isn’t nearly enough either.

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Isaac Paul Zabaglio

September 29, 2009

Here is another great Masterpiece!  My grandson Isaac Paul Zabaglio, born on June 17th, 2009.

He was created by Walter Zabaglio and Andrea Bassett Zabaglio.

He is a work of art that keeps on growing and adds dept, size, and texture to his composition.

Isaac Paul Zabaglio

Isaac Paul Zabaglio

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Mis/Connections

June 23, 2009

Life is full of misconnections.

We cross each other but we don’t meet.

Our paths cross up and down stairs, in halls, and on bridges.

We rather meet on cyberspace then in the open space.

Watch Here